Beige Blend Stabilized Pathway Mix - North Coast Harbor - Cleveland, OH

How to Maintain a Stabilized Pathway

Preventative upkeep and regular maintenance will go a long way towards keeping your pathways in good shape. But what are the specific steps you should be taking, and how do you fix a pathway once it’s been damaged? We’ve got the answers.

Kafka Granite’s Stabilized Pathway Mix is a combination of decomposed granite or crushed stone screenings blended with a stabilizing binder. Not only does it offer a natural, effortless look, but it also resists erosion and holds up well under traffic. But like all other outdoor installations, a stabilized pathway requires routine maintenance. Here’s a quick guide to keeping yours looking pristine.

Maintaining Your Stabilized Pathway

For Organic-Lock™ blended aggregates, we recommend doing a thorough analysis one week after installation, followed by monthly evaluations. These regular checks will allow you to identify damage and potential problem areas before they get out of hand.

Erosion

Erosion (usually from rainfall) is one of the most significant causes of damage. Fortunately, the stabilizing binders used in Kafka Granite’s mix allow pathways to resist erosion and hold up significantly better under heavy traffic than a standard or non-stabilized mix. If you do notice erosion damage to your pathway, the best course of action will be to figure out where the water is coming from and then divert it around the pathway. This can be accomplished by installing features such as drains, culverts, and diverters. Once you’ve successfully dealt with the source of the water issue, you can go about replacing any lost material.

Excess Loose Material

While Stabilized Pathways are designed to have some loose material on top, you may find that overtime the installation has more loose material than desired. As your stabilized pathway is exposed to foot traffic, the elements, and the passage of time, pieces of aggregate will eventually loosen on the surface of the installation. If the depth of these particles exceeds ¼ inch, it’s time to either sweep or shovel and remove them. Depending on how much material is removed, it may be recommended to replenish your pathway with new material.

Debris

In addition to excess loose material, debris will likely build up on your pathway. Depending on the location of the installation, that might include soil, gravel, grass clippings, or other organic material. You can remove debris from your stabilized pathway by hand raking or mechanically blowing the area.

Snow

If your stabilized pathway will be exposed to snow at any point during the year, it’s essential to understand how to properly plow it. The blade of the plow will need to be lifted ¼ inch off the surface of the pathway, which can be accomplished with either a shoe lift or rubber baffle. This small amount of space will allow you to plow snow without damaging the pathway beneath it.

Mixing Patch Material for a Stabilized Pathway

Even stabilized pathways that are diligently cared for may eventually require new material. We recommend keeping a small amount of the Organic-Lock blended aggregate on hand as attic stock. When the time comes to patch an area, you’ll have all the supplies you need to address the issue quickly and efficiently.

The Snowball or Step Test

Ideally, your mixture should reach a moisture content of 8-10%, which you can assess using the following techniques. If you can easily form a snowball-shaped handful with your material, it’s ready to go. But if it crumbles or has a wet sheen to it, you’ll need to add more water or more dry material. You can also test your mixture’s readiness by forming a rough ball and stepping on it. You should see a perfect impression of your bootprint, without any crumbling or noticeable wet sheen.

Too Wet

Too Dry

Just Right

Left foot print: too wet | Right foot print: ideal

Fixing Slightly Damaged Areas

If the pathway material below the loose surface particles is damaged, it will need to be fixed—because it can no longer stand up to erosion or traffic. Light damage can be reversed without excavating the area: simply soak the site, scarify with a rake to 1-2 inches, and then use a hand tamper or roller to compact the area.

Fixing Severe Damage to a Stabilized Pathway

Severe damage to your stabilized pathway will require a more in-depth fix. First, excavate the area to a depth of 2 inches to approximately a 50% increase in surface area. Evaluate and add an appropriate amount of stabilized pathway mix to the area. Finally, you’ll need to blend the new mix into the existing site. You have two options for this step:

  • Using multiple passes, rototill to a depth of 2 inches. Take care not to exceed the depth of the blended aggregate. To blend the existing and new material, spray the surface of the area lightly and begin to till. If needed, add water until you achieve the correct moisture content.
  • Remove the existing material and blend in new material on a clean pad. Depending on the size of your installation, you may use either a shovel or a front end loader to turn the material until you’ve created a homogenous blend. Finally, spread your mixture back over the excavated area, and add water until your mixture reaches its ideal consistency.

Pathway Mixes From Kafka Granite

When properly cared for, your stabilized pathway can last for years to come, offering a beautiful and functional route for public or private use. Kafka Granite is proud to provide the products and expert knowledge you need to make a project successful and maintain its integrity over time. If you have any questions about maintaining a stabilized pathway, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Moh's Hardness Test Example

What Is Mohs Hardness?

We’ve touched on the importance of quality control in stone products before—after all, consistency is critical throughout the process of manufacturing precast concrete aggregates and other specialty natural stone materials. Today, we’re diving even deeper into one of the factors that contribute to a stone’s inherent quality: Mohs hardness. Here’s some information on the history of the measurement and exactly what it means for consumers. 

A Quick History of Mohs Hardness

We have Friedrich Mohs, a German mineralogist, to thank for the Mohs scale of mineral hardness. This essential scale is used to measure the scratch resistance of a material like quartz or granite. Possible measurements range from 1 to 10, with 1 indicating the softest material and 10 the hardest.

Mohs created his scale in 1812 as a way to identify specific minerals. By scratching a specimen with one of ten reference minerals, a person could identify the relative hardness and, potentially, the exact type of mineral they were dealing with. Geologists in the field continue to use this method for identifying minerals. At times, hardness picks are used in place of reference minerals. In a pinch, ordinary objects like glass, a knife blade, or even your fingernail can be used to determine the relative hardness of a mineral. 

How Does Mohs Hardness Affect the End User?

The Mohs hardness scale is particularly important to Kafka Granite’s industrial customers, such as manufacturers of terrazzo flooring. Depending on what the aggregate is being used for, there may be an industry specification or product standard that states how hard the stone needs to be.

Continuing with our terrazzo example, those applications typically call for a softer stone, because it polishes easier. Marble is one excellent option here. On the other hand, manufacturers of architectural precast wall panels or decorative concrete pavers usually prefer to use aggregate made from one of the harder stones, because they are more abrasive—and they’re looking for an exposed aggregate finish that will last a lifetime. 

This abrasive quality allows harder stone products to stand up to harsh environments. Since terrazzo flooring is typically found indoors, it does not face the same elements of freeze/thaw, snow removal, and vehicular traffic that epoxy overlay streetscapes may be exposed to. Exposure to both natural elements and human traffic can play a significant role in the breakdown of a material.

Mohs Hardness and Construction Specifications

Before embarking on a project, manufacturers need to know that their chosen material meets certain industry standards or requirements. Depending on the product being manufactured, such as high-friction surfacing, there may be stringent specifications that need to be hit—both to ensure the integrity of an aggregate and the longevity of the finished product.

Take epoxy overlay aggregates, for example. Hardness is an extremely important quality for products made from these materials. The Department of Transportation (DOT) has a number of exact requirements for the types of stone they use in high-friction surfacing applications, including size and hardness of the aggregate. For obvious reasons, the DOT wants the stone to wear down as slowly as possible over time. A harder aggregate allows the final product, whether it be an entrance ramp or a bridge deck, to retain its integrity.

Sourcing stone that meets stringent specifications is no easy task, particularly if you’re searching for a particular color. Luckily, Kafka Granite offers a wide range of products with different levels of hardness. Whatever you have in mind, we’ll work to find a stone that matches your vision. You may only know that you need a hard, gray stone for your manufacturing project, for example. While we do have gray marble, we’re also able to supply gray granite that would better meet the needs of your project.

Mohs Hardness and Cost

Quality control in specialty aggregates is essential, but it’s not the only factor that will determine your choice of supplier. Hardness also has a direct effect on the equipment being used to process stone. More abrasive stone is harder on machinery and will eventually wear it down, while something that’s softer has less of an impact. This, in turn, affects cost—and potentially your ability to source certain materials. Marbles are more affordable to produce than quartz, for example. Ideally, industrial manufacturers will be able to work with their aggregate supplier to source material that both meets specifications and fits within their set budget.

High-Quality Aggregates for Your Next Building Project

Kafka Granite is proud to be one of the largest manufacturers and suppliers of specialty aggregates in the country. We offer over 60 varieties of crushed marble, quartz, granite, and recycled materials. If you’re searching for a specialty aggregate for use in architectural precast concrete, pavers, terrazzo flooring, or any number of natural stone products, contact us today to learn more about how we can crush and screen aggregates to your desired specifications.

Gun Metal & Misty Gray Marble Blend - Dimensional Cut

The Possible Applications of Natural Thin Stone Veneer

Natural stone gives both commercial and residential projects a highly sought-after, rugged look that has stood the test of time. Where trends fall out of fashion as the seasons change, natural stone sticks around. But all too often, designers and builders have to choose cheaper or more readily available options like manufactured stone for their projects.

Fortunately, natural thin stone veneer offers an attractive alternative. This versatile specialty building stone adds the same look of natural full stone veneer while lowering shipping and installation costs dramatically. This type of building stone has multiple uses and can complement a variety of interior and exterior projects—in fact, there are so many possible applications for natural stone veneer that it can be difficult to narrow down your options and determine exactly where you should use this material. 

If you’re looking for some natural stone veneer inspiration, you’ve come to the right place. Kafka Granite has spent decades sourcing natural stone from quarries across the continent. Our selection of natural thin stone veneer offers the perfect color and cut for every need, and we’re happy to help you figure out which option is right for your unique project. Here’s a look at some of the potential uses for natural thin stone veneer.

The Benefits of Utilizing Thin Stone Veneer

Thin stone veneer can range in thickness from ¾ inches to 1½ inches. This specification results in a product that weighs less than 15 pounds per square foot. Not only does this cut down significantly on shipping prices when compared to full veneer, but it also impacts installation costs. Due to its light weight, thin stone veneer doesn’t require footing or other supports, which makes the installation process simpler and often quicker than laying full veneer. 

Natural stone veneer can complement a wide variety of projects—both within a building or home and out. But while thin stone veneer is ideal for use in both commercial and residential projects, Kafka Granite does recommend hiring a professional stonemason to install this specialty product. He or she will be able to ensure that your natural stone materials are installed properly.

Applications of Natural Stone Veneer 

The sky is truly the limit when it comes to the use of natural thin stone veneer. This specialty building stone is a striking addition to any non-structural project, whether it be a restaurant building facade or an indoor waterfall. Let’s take a look at some of the many possible applications of thin stone veneer. 

Gun Metal & Misty Gray Marble Blend - Dimensional Cut

Gun Metal & Misty Gray Marble Blend – Dimensional Cut

Interior Thin Stone Veneer Projects

Natural thin stone veneer is an excellent option for incorporating the beautiful look of natural stone into an interior project. Because the product is relatively lightweight, thin stone veneer does not require special footing and can be easily installed for a variety of non-structural features, from accent walls to kitchen backsplashes. 


Interior Accent Walls

Whether you’re decking out your home in natural stone or just hoping to create a single accent wall, thin stone veneer will do the trick. Because quarried stone varies depending on its source, you’ll find a wide variety of colors available—and one is sure to match your vision.

Fireplace Projects

Indoor fireplaces can add a cozy feel to any room, depending on how they’re built and decorated. Natural stone veneer can turn a plain fireplace facade into an eye-catching centerpiece.

Gun Metal & Misty Gray Marble Blend - Dimensional Cut

Gun Metal & Misty Gray Marble Blend – Dimensional Cut

Kitchen Backsplashes

Backsplashes might not seem like an obvious choice for thin stone veneer, but they present a unique opportunity to showcase the beautiful, natural colors of these products.

Interior Accent Finishes

Perhaps you’re working within a smaller space or simply don’t want to use natural stone for an entire project. You can still incorporate the lovely look of natural stone with the help of thin stone veneer panels and other products. Our wide variety of cuts and colors makes finding the right accent for your project a breeze.

Exterior Uses for Thin Stone Veneer

Natural thin stone veneer also stands up extremely well in the outdoors. When installed with care and maintained correctly, this specialty building stone will retain its integrity and keep your project looking striking for years to come. 

But remember—if you are planning to utilize natural thin stone veneer in your exterior project, the surface area that will be in contact with the natural thin stone veneer will first need to be waterproofed before this specialty product can be installed. 

Gun Metal Marble - Dimensional Cut

Gun Metal Marble – Dimensional Cut

Exterior Siding and Columns

Natural thin stone veneer is an ideal material for exterior or partial wall siding, as well as exterior columns. The material holds up extremely well to the elements, including harsh winds, rain, and snow. Whether you’re looking to add some old-world country charm to your home or create a clean, contemporary feel for the front wall of a business, you’ll be able to find the perfect blend amongst our numerous cuts and colors.

Gun Metal & Misty Gray Marble Blend - Dimensional Cut

Gun Metal & Misty Gray Marble Blend – Dimensional Cut

Chimney Surfacing

Natural stone can look just as handsome on your exterior chimney as it can adorning your fireplace—even as time and the elements weather the product. In contrast to cultured stone, which can fade over time, natural stone will retain its color and integrity, giving you a chimney surface or other exterior project that lasts.

Natural Stone Veneer From Kafka Granite

Over the past 40 years, Kafka Granite has distinguished itself as an industry leader in specialty aggregates, and we’re proud to extend that same level of excellence, dedication, and innovation to our specialty masonry stone products. Reach out today to speak to a knowledgeable sales representative. We look forward to helping you incorporate natural stone into your project.